fer1972:

Steel Cityscape Sculpture by Hu Shaoming

archiemcphee:

Tanbo art (田んぼアート) or “rice paddy art” is the work of Japanese farmers who plant different strains of rice in order to transform their rice paddies into enormous living canvases. No dyes or other artificial colouring methods are used in this process. Each colour is simply a different type of rice.

"Often, hundreds of villagers work together to plant the rice by hand and create these massive works of art. While planting, different areas of the rice paddy are roped off, so people know which type of rice to put where—kind of like painting by numbers.

Rice is planted in the spring, and then harvested in the fall. When it gets close to harvest, the color changes to a beautiful hue called “koganeiro” (黄金色), which is often translated as “golden” or “honey-colored”. This means the art changes as the seasons change.”

Visit Kotaku to learn more about this awesome Japanese artform.

archiemcphee:

At a glance you might guess that this cute spread of grilled goodies was computer-generates, but look closely and you’ll see that it’s all made of paper. These 1:1 scale card stock drumsticks, hotdogs, kebabs, steak, and assorted condiments all began as intricate illustrations which were then precisely translated into an awesome three-dimensional installation.

Entitled BBQ, this piece is the work of Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, who work together in Nancy, France as the creative studio of Zim&Zou. Instead of composing images on computers, Lucie and Thibault prefer creating real objects with paper and then photographing them. “>Their choice of paper is due to the versatility and good quality of the material, especially when it is sculpted and photographed.”

Visit the Zim&Zou website to view more of their creations.

[via Designboom]

nataliescourageclub:

Art History Meme ❧ 2/7 Sculptures

The Genius of Evil (1848), St. Paul’s Cathedral, Liège.
The Genius of Evil, known informally in English as Lucifer or The Lucifer of Liège, is a religious sculpture executed in white marble by the Belgian artist Guillaume Geefs. It depicts a classically beautiful man in his physical prime, chained, seated, and nearly nude but for drapery gathered over his thighs, his full length ensconced within a mandorla of bat wings.  The magnificently human figure of the iconic rebel who failed might have been expected to elicit a complex or ambivalent response. The suffering face has been read as expressing remorse and despair; a tear slips from the left eye.

nataliescourageclub:

Art History Meme ❧ 2/7 Sculptures

The Genius of Evil (1848)St. Paul’s Cathedral, Liège.

The Genius of Evil, known informally in English as Lucifer or The Lucifer of Liège, is a religious sculpture executed in white marble by the Belgian artist Guillaume Geefs. It depicts a classically beautiful man in his physical prime, chained, seated, and nearly nude but for drapery gathered over his thighs, his full length ensconced within a mandorla of bat wings.  The magnificently human figure of the iconic rebel who failed might have been expected to elicit a complex or ambivalent response. The suffering face has been read as expressing remorse and despair; a tear slips from the left eye.

fer1972:

‘Objects’ by Kevin LCK

archiemcphee:

UK-based artist Susanna Bauer has exceptional needlework skills and, we’re guessing, a very gentle touch, that enable her to use dried leaves as a canvas for some of her miniature art pieces.

“Most of my pieces are small sculptural objects often based on found natural materials. I like giving time to the inconspicuous things that surround us and often go unnoticed, paying attention to small details and the tactile quality of objects. Appropriating traditional craft techniques like weaving and crochet as a means of sculpture brings a contemplative element to the development of my work. I am interested in unusual combinations of materials, the experimentation with fragility and strength and the individual stories that evolve and shape themselves in the process of making.”

The next time you find a dried leaf, pick it up and examine just how fragile they are and you’ll be all the more amazed by Susanna Bauer’s beautiful artwork. Visit her website to check out more of her work.

[via Design Taxi]

phobs-heh:

Ouidah, Benin, voodoo ceremony - Egungun spirits

essell2:

ILLUSTRATION BY J.C. LEYENDECKER